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Outsourced Manufacturing and Trade Secrets: Manufacturing Process & Personnel (Part 7)

Outsourced Manufacturing and Trade Secrets: Manufacturing Process & Personnel (Part 7) by David L. Cohen

After deciding on the basic corporate or contractual structure, the company should decide how best to strategically divide the manufacturing process. In the outsourced manufacturing context, the best process involves not only efficient manufacture, but also the most effective process to mitigate potential trade secret risks. Read more

Outsourced Manufacturing and Trade Secrets: Transaction Structure & Contract (Part 6)

Outsourced Manufacturing and Trade Secrets: Transaction Structure & Contract by David L. Cohen

Transaction Structure

Once the company selects a potential outsourced manufacturing partner, it should design a transaction structure that reinforces its commercial expectations and the manufacturer’s contractual obligations. Specifically, the company should structure the outsourced manufacturing transaction in a manner best suited to protect the company’s key intellectual assets (both registered IP and unregistered IP like trade secrets and know-how). Transaction structure considerations include both the particular corporate and contractual form of the relationship, and how the company will delegate the manufacturing process to the outsourced manufacturer. Read more

Tech’s Frightful Five and Their Allies Come to Brussels

Tech’s Frightful Five and their Allies Come to Brussels by David L. Cohen

Over the past 100 years corporate America has become quite sophisticated in how it lobbies the US Federal and State government and regulators.   While the messages being promoted may differ, lobbying for corporate interests as diverse as tobacco, sugar (and here), firearms, the environment, fossil fuels, health insurance (and here), financial regulation, and many other fields has become a major business in Washington and around the country.  Indeed, some have argued that the sheer scale of corporate lobbying has allowed it to conquer democracy in America.

It is no surprise, then that Tech’s Frightful Five (Apple, Alphabet/Google, Amazon, Facebook and Microsoft) have become masters of the lobbying game in America.

Read more

Tech’s Frightful Five and Their Allies Come to Brussels

Tech’s Frightful Five and their Allies Come to Brussels by David L. Cohen

Over the past 100 years corporate America has become quite sophisticated in how it lobbies the US Federal and State government and regulators.   While the messages being promoted may differ, lobbying for corporate interests as diverse as tobacco, sugar (and here), firearms, the environment, fossil fuels, health insurance (and here), financial regulation, and many other fields has become a major business in Washington and around the country.  Indeed, some have argued that the sheer scale of corporate lobbying has allowed it to conquer democracy in America.

It is no surprise, then that Tech’s Frightful Five (Apple, Alphabet/Google, Amazon, Facebook and Microsoft) have become masters of the lobbying game in America.

Read more

Outsourced Manufacturing and Trade Secrets: Internal Controls (Part 4)

Outsourced Manufacturing and Trade Secrets: Internal Controls by David L. CohenWhen a company, for the soundest of business reasons, is exploring placing its crown jewels, its intellectual assets, in the hands of a third party, proper internal controls are vital.

A company’s internal controls may help to ensure proper:

  • Vetting and selection of the prospective manufacturer during the due diligence process.
  • Negotiation of the outsourced manufacturing relationship.
  • Management of the outsourced manufacturing transaction and relationship with the manufacturer.

Read more

Outsourced Manufacturing and Trade Secrets: Outsourced Manufacturing (Part 2)

Outsourced Manufacturing and Trade Secrets: Outsourced Manufacturing by David L. Cohen

There are two common categories of outsourced manufacturing: toll manufacturing and contract manufacturing. While both these manufacturing options have distinct and clear characteristics, their strategic advantage is their ability to provide customers with valuable ways to save both time and capital on their product line development. Read more

Outsourced Manufacturing and Trade Secrets: An Economic Overview (Part 1)

Since the beginning of the industrial age, companies have outsourced part of the manufacturing process to third-party providers. In the twentieth century, as manufacturing processes became more complex and distribution more global, this trend accelerated.

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Meet the IP Thought Leaders: Robert Colao

Meet the IP Thought Leaders: Robert Colao by David L. CohenOver the course of my 20+ years practicing law, I have had the honor of working with many individuals who are involved at the cutting edge of all aspects of intellectual property. I consider myself very lucky that most of these folks, in addition to being luminaries in the industry, are good people and have welcomed me into their professional world with open arms. To celebrate these individuals, I am inaugurating a series of interviews.

My next interviewee, Robert Colao, is the founder and President of radiusIP®, Inc.  He is currently also the Chief Licensing Executive for SIPCO, LLC and IP Co, LLC, and is responsible for the overall licensing efforts and business aspects of the ESSENTIAL WIRELESS MESH™ portfolio/licensing program. Read more

Patent Demand Letters – Escalation or Litigation (Part 5)

Patent Disputes Part 2 - Escalation or Litigation by David L. CohenIf the patent demand letter situation escalates and you may be sued for infringement, you have options to consider.

  1. Consider filing a lawsuit for declaratory judgment (DJ).

In certain cases you may file a lawsuit against a patent owner for declaration that you are not infringing on any valid patents. Knowing the patent owner’s litigation history is crucial when considering this option. Read more

Patent Demand Letters – Response Tactics (Part 4)

Patent Demand Letter Response Tactics by David L. CohenIf you receive a patent demand letter, you can choose from many courses of action, but each has pros and cons. Today we will discuss some immediate considerations to consider.

  1. Doing nothing is an option, but a risky one.

Pro: Some patent owners are not committed to actually filing lawsuits. They cast a wide net with lots of demand letters, knowing some recipients will pay nominal amounts to make it go away. If you ignore it, there’s a chance there will be no serious follow-up.

Con: Ignoring a patent demand letter may lead the patent owner to file a lawsuit to get your attention. Read more